Dutch Invertuals ‘Body Language’ exhibition

As every year, Milan Design Week is an excellent showcase for emerging designers. This year one of the most interesting things that I saw was the Body Language exhibition of Dutch Invertuals.

Dutch Invertuals is a group of designers who are expanding the limits in their profession. Designers with different backgrounds, but with one thing in common: experiment is principal. After five successive years of presenting their work at the Salone del Mobile, the design-collective is becoming an esteemed regular, turning their exhibition at O’ into a well-known hotspot. Within the context of the future way of life the designers explore the esthetics and complexities of an increasingly virtual world. Technology is becoming invisible. The in-tactile world is gaining ground in the understanding of who we are. While physical objects lose function, forms are freed, orphaned and adopted. What is left are merely bodies reflecting our identities. All this requires a renegotiation of the space around us and it’s effects on being human. Generations to come will refer to the past as primitive. This exhibition is an exploration that reflects, moves, shines and glows. Crafting materials with character rather than function. Flirting with new esthetics and usabilities. At the same time they cultivate the presence of a new kind of language: BODY LANGUAGE.

Aliki van der Kruijs — Daylit
Aliki van der Kruijs — Daylit
Alissa+Nienke — Dialogue 01

Alissa+Nienke — Dialogue 01

Daphna Laurens — Inutile
Daphna Laurens — Inutile

Daphna Laurens — Inutile

Germans Ermics — Shaping Colour
Germans Ermics — Shaping Colour

Germans Ermics — Shaping Colour

Tijmen Smeulders — Boundary

Tijmen Smeulders — Boundary

Tijmen Smeulders — Floater

Tijmen Smeulders — Floater

Tijmen Smeulders — Plateau

Tijmen Smeulders — Plateau

Michael Anastassiades at Euroluce

Michael Anastassiades — Euroluce

As you already know, one of my favorite items are lamps. I believe that they are the only products that give me a thrill when I look them. Precisely for this reason, I fall in love often during Euroluce. Also this year, I found several lamps that fascinated me, like those of Michael Anastassiades. I've always been a big fan of Anastassiades, and I think that besides being a great designer, he's a poet of light. Just for this, its lamps seem always artworks, or sculptures. Don't you think? These are his last lamps presented at the fair in Milan.

Michael Anastassiades — Mobile Chandelier 9
Michael Anastassiades — Mobile Chandelier 9
Michael Anastassiades — Mobile Chandelier 10
Michael Anastassiades — Mobile Chandelier 7
Michael Anastassiades — Mobile Chandelier 8
Michael Anastassiades — Somewhere in the middle
Michael Anastassiades — Rest

Way Point — Atelier

Way Point — Jeté — Tommaso Caldera

We are in love with our products, but also the stories that revolve around you. And this is precisely Way Point Atelier: not a collection, not a brand, but an account of an experience. The beginning of a new story, still without an ending, that we have chosen to tell. 

This is the philosophy of Way Point, that during this design week presents 9 new products designed by emerging designers. The result of this research is a series of beautiful and playful lamps, such as those designed by the talented Tommaso CalderaStudio BrichetZiegler and Studio Sovrappensiero.

We like to think of our products as containers of stories. Stories of forms and materials, thoughts and technologies. The stories are told, are listened to, are remembered. But above all the stories are lived.
— Alberto Baesso, R&D Way Point
Way Point — Plié  — Tommaso Caldera
Way Point — Cirrus — StudioBrichetZiegler
Way Point — Cirrus — StudioBrichetZiegler
Way Point — Sunset
Way Point — Sunset